Former Heisman Trophy winner Rashaan Salaam dead at 42

By: Tod Leonard, 12/6/2016 | LA Times

“Salaam — who lived in Superior, Colo., about eight miles southeast of Boulder — went to Colorado after a standout career at La Jolla Country Day.

In 1999, Salaam admitted a marijuana addiction contributed to his career downfall. He lost 14 fumbles in 31 games and told ESPN he thought the issue was related to marijuana.

“It probably had me out there lackadaisical instead of being out there 100 percent,” he said then. “Everybody thinks getting high is cool, you can let it go when you want to let it go. But it’s just as potent as alcohol. It’s just as potent as cocaine.”

 

Former Heisman Trophy winner Rashaan Salaam dead at 42

Rashaan Salaam accomplished the improbable, rising from playing 8-man football at La Jolla Country Day in San Diego to win the Heisman Trophy in 1994. It was Salaam’s greatest achievement, earned barely two months beyond his 20th birthday, and one that he candidly admitted in the ensuing years he couldn’t match.

 

 

Coroner: Former Heisman Trophy winner Rashaan Salaam had THC in his blood at the time of his suicide

DENVER, Dec 29 (Reuters) – Rashaan Salaam, a winner of college football’s Heisman Trophy, committed suicide by shooting himself in the head in a park in Boulder, Colorado, earlier this month, a county coroner said on Thursday.

A toxicology report showed Salaam, 42, had a blood-alcohol level of 0.25, three times the legal limit for operating a vehicle in Colorado. His blood also contained 55 nanograms of THC, the psychoactive property of marijuana.

Coroner reveals Heisman Trophy winner Rashaan Salaam committed suicide

DENVER, Dec 29 (Reuters) – Rashaan Salaam, a winner of college football’s Heisman Trophy, committed suicide by shooting himself in the head in a park in Boulder, Colorado, earlier this month, a county coroner said on Thursday. A toxicology report showed Salaam, 42, had a blood-alcohol level of 0.25, three times the legal limit for operating a vehicle in Colorado.

 

 

Downward spiral: how addiction decimated a Wyoming family

By: Sabine Heinlein, Feb 23, 2017, The Guardian

The state’s suicide rate is three times the national average and 16% of its people experience alcoholism or addiction.
Alex’s family are the faces behind the addictions.

Melissa, the oldest of Danielle’s three girls, remembers the tragic day in 2004 clearly. Then 12 years old, she had caught 13-year-old Pete smoking marijuana with a cousin. She told Danielle. As part of his punishment, he was to sit in his room, with no books, magazines or video games.

As she recalls the story, Melissa is calm and thoughtful, not unlike her stepfather. She seems like the kind of person who has everything under control, but as you dig deeper, her struggle emerges.

When Alex came home from work that day Danielle was in bed, like most of the time. The first thing he did was check in on Pete. He found him reading a magazine that Melissa had slipped him. “Mom said nothing is nothing,” Alex said, taking away the magazine. He went to light the BBQ to make dinner. It was a warm summer evening, and Melissa was playing horsey with her three- and five-year-old half-sisters.

Suddenly, Melissa heard Alex screaming. “When I walked over to the bedroom door and looked in, I thought that they were fighting,” she remembers. “But when Alex laid my brother on the ground, I saw that he wasn’t breathing, that he was purple and blue. I ran and woke up my mom, and she started freaking out, so I grabbed the phone and called 911. Then I grabbed my little sisters and my cousin and I told them that they needed to go outside.”

Alex says it couldn’t have been more than 15 minutes until he went back to check on Pete. He had hanged himself in his closet.

Downward spiral: how addiction decimated a Wyoming family

Alex remembers taking his wife to see a psychic. The psychic came highly recommended by her doctor. Danielle was struggling. Pete, her son from a previous relationship, had killed himself in 2004. He was only 13. Alex drove 180 miles west from Rock Springs, Wyoming, where the couple lived, to Rainbow Gardens in Ogden, Utah.

 

 

Accidental Deaths Marijuana Use

The Death of Brandon, Oregon Teen

Oregon teens dead body found after suffering a panic attack at home smoking a “dab” (potent THC-marijuana concentrate)

Missing Oregon Teens Body Found

Brandon Powell, 18, left his house in the 400 block of Southwest Ivy Road early Sunday morning, Sandy police spokesman Officer Sam Craven said. Powell’s family told police he had a panic attack after smoking a dab, a potent marijuana concentrate. Powell left his home wearing only blue pajama pants and no shirt or shoes, Craven said.

From his mother’s Facebook page:

Missing Sandy teen’s body found in Clackamas River

The body of an 18-year-old man, missing since mid-March, was found last week, the Sandy Police Department announced. A 911 caller reported seeing a body floating in the Clackamas River on Friday near the Milo McIver State Park, according to a press release.

 

 

SPD report: Hamza Warsame death an accident

Wednesday, May 11, 2016 – 12:44 pm by Bryan Cohen

Police report:Muslim teen smoked marijuana, jumped from balcony to his death

A Seattle Police report completed earlier this year and recently made available reveals more details on why authorities believe the 16-year-old’s death was an accident and not a hate crime. The newly released report follows the determination by the King County Medical Examiner that Warsame’s death was accidental. Chief among the new details: the teen may have been trying to jump to an adjacent roof after smoking marijuana for the first time.

The report also includes the first information released about the 21-year student who was with Warsame when he fell.

Warsame’s blood was later found to contain “relatively high” levels of THC, the psychoactive component in marijuana. While Warsame’s judgement may have been impaired by the drug given to him by his classmate, King County prosecutors said that the classmate was not responsible for Warsame’s death. The office agreed with investigators that the death was accidental and did not file charges in the case.

A Seattle Police investigation into the death of 16-year-old Seattle Central College student Hamza Warsame determined the teen leapt from the balcony of a Capitol Hill apartment on Dec. 5, putting to rest initial speculation across social media that the young Muslim had been the victim of a hate crime. Warsame’s classmate told police the two had met to work on a school project and, at one point, Warsame expressed an interest in trying marijuana, which the student had in his apartment, the report states. He said Warsame became frantic while the student was preparing food, stating he needed air and was worried he had done something offensive in regard to his religion. It was shortly after this that the student reported to police that Warsame jumped from the small balcony, falling approximately 40 feet.

SPD report: Hamza Warsame death an accident

When Hamza Warsame fell to his death from a Capitol Hill apartment building in December 2015, it sparked an international controversy and an outpouring of grief and outrage within Seattle’s Muslim community. Concerns spread that the promising Seattle Central College student had been the victim of an anti-Muslim hate crime and the Seattle Police Department was withholding information on the case.

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