Marijuana Threat Assessment, Part One: Recent Evidence for Health Risks of Marijuana Use

David W. Murray, Brian Blake & John P. Walters Nov 2, 2016 Hudson.org Hudson Institute Where more than one of these factors is present, the risks escalate; where the developmentally young smoke high-potency cannabis frequently for an extended period – most markedly those with predisposing psychological deficits – the effects can be catastrophic in their lives, including dramatic “psychotic breaks.” These effects appear to be, in some cases, largely irreversible. And it is this “worst-case scenario” that, perversely, is being fostered by state legalization and commercialization measures, thereby ensuring the greatest magnitude of damage. These finding are warnings of grave danger, with the promise of yet more to be discovered. Not all is “proven,” and not all establishes independent causation, but the evidence is strong enough, and growing daily, to activate in public policy a “precautionary principle.” That is, the evidence is strong enough to warrant a clear directive not to proceed further. Simply put, the pathway of (marijuana) legalization must not be pursued.

Marijuana Threat Assessment, Part One: Recent Evidence for Health Risks of Marijuana Use – by David W. Murray Brian Blake John P. Walters

Thanks to advances in science, we have never known so much about the effects marijuana use has on the human body, particularly, the fragile brain. Yet, in a political era when scientific research is regularly marshalled to end public policy debates, the powerful, growing scholarship on marijuana has largely been ignored or dismissed.


Prop 64: Warning from San Diego health experts about recreational pot

CBS News 8 – San Diego, CA News Station – KFMB Channel 8 By Richard Allyn, Reporter  


Mysterious Marijuana-Related Illness Popping Up In Emergency Rooms

The vomiting illness is increasing in states with legal pot. The Huffington Post 1-2-17 By Mary Papenfuss The symptoms are severe abdominal pain and violent vomiting — and most doctors are initially stumped when they encounter patients with the problem. Since 2009, when the federal government relaxed its stance on medical marijuana, emergency room diagnoses for CHS (cannabinoid-hyperemesis-syndrome) in two of Colorado’s hospitals nearly doubled, according to a study co-authored by Dr. Kennon Heard, a physician at the University of Colorado Hospital in Aurora. Now that cannabis is also legal for recreational use in the state, “we are seeing it quite frequently,” Heard told CBS News. “My colleagues are seeing this on a daily to weekly basis.”

Mysterious Marijuana-Related Illness Popping Up In Emergency Rooms

A mysterious marijuana-related illness is popping up with increasing frequency in hospital emergency rooms, particularly in states where cannabis is now legal. The symptoms are severe abdominal pain and violent vomiting – and most doctors are initially stumped when they encounter patients with the problem.


Palm Beach police: Babysitter unknowingly eats pot cookies, calls 911

By Eleanor Roy – Daily News Staff Writer Jan 24, 2017 A Palm Beach babysitter who police said unknowingly ate chocolate chip cookies laced with marijuana ended up in the hospital last week after she called 911 and told officers she thought she was dying from a brain tumor. The babysitter — whose name the Daily News is withholding — was watching two children when she ate some cookies she found in the refrigerator. According to the report, she started feeling sick about 30 minutes later. Officer Dean Morea arrived at the scene at 9:47 p.m. “[The victim] was hallucinating and was stating that she felt like she was going to die and that she thinks she may have a brain tumor,” Morea wrote in the report. “[The victim] continuously asked us if she was going to die and to pray for her.” Paramedics wanted to commit the babysitter under the Baker Act, but Morea recognized the victim’s symptoms as drug-related and urged them to wait, the report said. When he spoke with the two children, they told Morea that they thought the cookies belonged to their mother and that they only eat store-bought cookies. The report stated a field test revealed that the cookies had THC — the active chemical in marijuana — in them. The babysitter was taken to St. Mary’s Medical Center for treatment.

Palm Beach police: Babysitter unknowingly eats pot cookies, calls 911

A Palm Beach babysitter who police said unknowingly ate chocolate chip cookies laced with marijuana ended up in the hospital last week after she called 911 and told officers she thought she was dying from a brain tumor. A police report documented the incident that unfolded at a Midtown home late Jan.


Two ER physicians from both CO and CA present marijuana harms at SAM Summit

Aubree Adams

Smart Approach to Marijuana summit 2018, Emergency Room, Dr. Lev

Doctor who was taught to over prescribe pills now works to counter the marijuana epidemic Ronnet Lev, M.D. (ER physician at Scripps Mercy Hospital, San Diego, CA)

Aubree Adams

Smart Approach to Marijuana summit 2018, Dr. Karen Randall

Karen Randall, ER physician in Pueblo, CO presents at the SAM Summit (Atlanta) 4-5-18 “join the fight against THC marijuana” Karen Randall, M.D. (ER physician at Parkland Medical Center, Pueblo, CO)


Danish studies make clear the Mental Health Risks of Cannabis

A third large study (Starzer et al., 2017) now confirms the conversion from a drug-induced psychotic break to the chronic mental illnesses schizophrenia or bipolar disorder is highest when the drug in question is marijuana. Remarkably, the estimated conversion rate from a marijuana-induced psychotic break to a chronic mental disorder with psychotic features is virtually the same in 3 independent studies: 47% (Starzer et al., 2017); 46% (Niemi-Pyntarri et al., 2013); and 50% (Arendt et al., 2008).

Rates and Predictors of Conversion to Schizophrenia or Bipolar Disorder Following Substance-Induced Psychosis. – PubMed – NCBI

Am J Psychiatry. 2018 Apr 1;175(4):343-350. doi: 10.1176/appi.ajp.2017.17020223. Epub 2017 Nov 28.

 


Cannabis Linked to Bipolar Symptoms in Young Adults

Researchers at Warwick University Medical School in the UK have linked marijuana use in adolescence to bipolar symptoms in early adulthood. They analyzed data from 3,370 women participating in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children and found that marijuana use two to three times a week is a risk factor for hypomania at ages 22-23. Hypomania is defined as “elevated mood alongside irritability or an inflated ego, an unrealistic sense of superiority, a reduced need for sleep, and frenzied speech.” Such symptoms frequently occur in those who suffer from bipolar disorder. Read the University of Warwick news release: Cannabis Linked to Bipolar Symptoms in Young Adults


UnTested, UnProven

Pesticides and Pot: What’s California Smoking?

Pesticides and Pot: What’s California Smoking?

When Todd Gullion of Orange County was suffering with back pain last year, he decided to try medical marijuana, thinking it was a safer alternative than prescription drugs. But Gullion says after using the pot, he ended up in the emergency room with serious neurological symptoms. “My hands go numb, my arms go numb, my feet go numb,” Gullion told NBC4.


   

Brain Function

Study reveals negative long-term effects of heavy cannabis use on brain function and behavior

Study reveals negative long-term effects of heavy cannabis use on brain function and behavior

Young people with cannabis dependence have altered brain function that may be the source of emotional disturbances and increased psychosis risk that are associated with cannabis abuse, according to a new study published in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging.


Psychosis

Psychosis leads to a spectrum of psych affective disorders ( mood disorders like bipolar disorder). See our science expert Christine Miller talk about marijuana and psychosis in this video.

Dr. Miller discusses connection between marijuana use and psychosis

This video is about Moms Strong- Dr. Christine Miller

For scientific evidence of marijuana psychosis and violence, visit our Christine Miller, Honorary Advisor page.


Heart

Marijuana and Coronary Heart Disease – American College of Cardiology

Marijuana is the most commonly abused drug in the United States. 1 It mainly acts on cannabinoid receptors. There are two types of cannabinoid receptors in humans: cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB 1) and cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB 2). CB 1 receptor activation is pro-atherogenic, and CB 2 receptor activation is largely anti-atherogenic.


Lungs

Marijuana Lung

Further studies with larger numbers of patients and animal models are needed to confirm the link between bullous lung disease and marijuana use. However, our case is another example of this possible connection and it is important for both the radiologist and clinician to remember this relationship the next time they encounter a young patient with prominent apical bullous disease and/or a spontaneous pneumothorax.

 

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Addiction

Is marijuana addictive?

Marijuana use can lead to the development of problem use, known as a marijuana use disorder, which takes the form of addiction in severe cases.


Suicide

Click here for our Pot Related Suicides page

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